A Month of Sundays

mmt872-flatpack1

 

A real estate agent is suffering through a mid-life crisis. And what – we’re supposed to care? Well, thanks to a beautifully understated performance by Anthony LaPaglia, returning to his home town of Adelaide, and the skill of writer-director Matthew Saville, A Month of Sundays (2016) does indeed achieve the near impossible, eliciting sympathy for a member of one of the most derided, disreputable professions on God’s green earth.

Frank Mollard (LaPaglia) is wavering on the verge of a terminal fadeout. Having recently lost his mother, he’s become utterly listless, exhibiting little or no enthusiasm for his work. Going through the motions one evening after another blandly successful auction he couldn’t care less about, he receives a strange phone call from a woman, Sarah (Julia Blake), who sounds eerily close to his mother and who addresses him as son. Disorientated, Frank loses himself in the moment and continues the surreal exchange before the truth finally comes to light. It’s a wrong number, a strange miscommunication. But Frank is intrigued by this woman and calls her again the next day before arranging a lunch engagement. Their initial meeting becomes a regular one during which more detailed aspects of their troubled lives come to light.

Saville’s two previous features both dealt with characters attached to the police force. His impressive debut Noise (2007) was followed by the equally noteworthy accident cover-up tale of Felony (2013) in which a trio of officers with very different agendas attempt to juggle damaging ethical compulsions with a hard-edged loyalty to their own kind. A Month of Sundays is impressive for many reasons but mostly because it strikes such a perfect balance between drama and a previously unrevealed vein of black humour, often interspersing scenes with Frank’s boss Philip Lang, played to perfection by John Clarke. The film often has a wonderfully pensive, slowed-down, unrushed feel to it as well. Most refreshingly, Saville allows, at times, real-world sounds and uncomfortable silences to carry scenes in which Frank is drawn into an internal examination of his troubles.

It’s an impressively crafted portrait and LaPaglia, with intuitive skills and a subduing of Frank’s emotional register, allows us a telling, often moving glimpse of his struggles with reasoning and inspiration. His interactions with his teenage son and ex-wife (Justine Clarke) occasionally hit upon the odd wrong note but at the core of A Month of Sundays is Frank’s tale and it’s one told with great conviction by an emerging young Australian filmmaker.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s