A Perfect Day

perfect_day

 

Irony and hardship often arrive simultaneously, a fact that Aid Across Borders workers can fully appreciate in Fernando Leon de Aranoa’s sublimely crafted A Perfect Day (2015), his first English-language Spanish film. Working in a remote part of the Balkans to free a corpse from a well and thus eliminate the threat of water pollution for the locals are Sophie (Melanie Thierry), B (Tim Robbins) and their leader Mambru (Benicio Del Toro). They soon learn all about the incongruency of humour inflicted by a turmoil that you either laugh at or cry in the face of.

A broken rope just as they near completion of lifting the bloated cadaver from the well leaves them exposed by their lack of resources. Attempting to procure another with the aid of their translator Damir (Fedja Stukan) turns into some ordeal as resentment and distrust from local communities keeps them at arm’s length. Along the way they encounter strategically placed dead cows in the middle of the road that may or may not be concealing explosives. They also pick up a young boy, Nikola (Eldar Residovic) who they save from bullies, and receive extra assistance from another Aid worker who also happens to be Mambru’s old flame, Katya (Olga Kurylenko).

Hypocrisy at higher levels of decision making and the often untenable separation of logic from a solution because of infernal reams of red tape form a significant part of the screenplay by Aranoa and Diego Farias, based on a novel by Paula Farias. But these become secondary to the characterisations which carry the film, providing it with texture, form and empathy in the shape of a fully fleshed out ensemble whose interactions are always dramatically engaging and often bleakly humorous. There are few dramatic flourishes or suspenseful moments or even a countdown to a major resolution. But A Perfect Day is no poorer in any way for this lack of attention to conventionality. It makes up for any superficial shortcomings with delicate, humourous interplay and a great deal of heart.

Aranoa’s lone dubious creative choice may be in saturating the soundtrack with a barrage of rock tracks though it’s hard to deny that certain choices, even if unsubtly deployed, prove effective. The acting is first-rate with the testy relationship between Mambru and Katya accounting for many of the film’s best scenes. Robbins has his best role in years as the carefree B, whilst Thierry is given a few memorable moments as the group’s newcomer, alternating between outrage, fright and bemusement at her co-workers’ often less than unorthodox methods of operation.

 

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